Island Realty Luxury Homes

What A Bay!

by Virginia Prichett 6. July 2011 08:27

DeWolf Tavern, BristolLast week was a big anniversary celebration for my husband and I. There was only one place we wanted to be: on the water in Narragansett Bay. We sailed off our mooring on the east side of Jamestown and headed for Bristol late one morning. After a lovely, short sail which took us along Prudence Island we arrived at the harbor. The friendly Harbormaster gave us a mooring # and told us that because we were just stopping for lunch...no charge. We rowed into the closest dock, hoping it was "allowable" to store our dinghy. The sign said the dock is reserved for patrons of a number of places, and one of them is where we had planned lunch, the DeWolff Tavern. We walked up the dock, into a charming, historic stone building and out to the terrace. We enjoyed a fabulous lunch (my husband recommends the seared sea scallops with garam masala sauce) and then had another beautiful sail home. We were in Jamestown by 5 after a glorious outing. Another Narragansett Bay gem.

-Ginny


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The J's Are Back! J Class Newport Regatta 2011

by Carol Hopkins 9. June 2011 10:43

Velsheda (1933)

There is going to be an exciting sailing regatta of the J Class yachts from June 15th to June 19th in Newport. Velsheda, Ranger and Shamrock V will be participating in what is the first of a series of global J Class events. I am only a novice sailor, but I do know that I don't want to miss seeing these magnificent yachts on Narragansett Bay. I would suggest going to either Beavertail or Fort Wetherill to catch a glimpse. Also, Castle Hill will be a great vantage point.

The starts and finishes are off of Fort Adams with viewing stands set up on the Northwestern corner of Fort Adams.

J Class is a rating for large sailing yachts desinged between 1930 and 1937. They were used to compete in three races of the America's Cup.  According to jclassyachts.com, "Ten massive yachts conforming to J rule were built between 1930 and 1937, although more were designed and tank tested. They were all but extinct, however three English yachts survived. In 2000, the new J Class Association was formed to 'promote, protect and develop' the interests of these wonderful yachts."


The race schedule is as follows:

Wednesday, June 15: Race 1, start 1 PM

Thursday, June 16: Race 2, start 1 PM 

Friday, June 17: Race 3, start 1 PM

Saturday, June 18: Race 4, start 1 PM

Sunday, June 19: Race 5, start 1 PM


So, when you are feeling overwhelmed and tired, and you just need a break, go to one of these vantage points with an iced coffee or a picnic and enjoy the beauty of these yachts.


-Carol Hopkins


401.423.2200
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 *Photo titled 'Velsheda Solent' by Frank Crossley

The Return of Dockwise

by Virginia Prichett 1. June 2011 10:11



Each year in the late spring, the huge orange ship shows up in Newport Harbor to begin its delivery of yachts transported here to Narragansett Bay to spend summer in arguably the best sailing/cruising area in the United States. 

I checked out their website a little while ago. There are 4 ships, including one super sized ship, that travel to about 18 destinations worldwide to pick up and deliver. Destinations include the cruising grounds many of us are familiar with, including St. Thomas and the Bahamas. But in fact, New Zealand, Tahiti, Turkey, France and Italy are among the other interesting ports where Dockwise makes regular stops.

I took this excerpt from their website, but there is lots of interesting information, so I’d suggest you check it out. Meanwhile, if you’re out in the bay, it’s fascinating to watch the unloading of the yachts. And in the fall, the ship reloads and takes its cargo to winter cruising grounds.

www.yacht-transport.com/homepage.html

Dockwise Yacht Transport (DYT) is the world's leading yacht logistics company offering hassle-free yacht & boat transport to the most desirable cruising grounds of the world.
DYT serves its customers with a global network of 10 offices and representatives. With its own fleet of semi-submersible yacht carriers, DYT provides top quality service and reliable scheduling throughout the year.


-Ginny Prichett

401.423.2200
islandrealtyri.com
 

Sheep Shearing Day at Watson Farm of Jamestown

by Elaine Infantolino 9. May 2011 08:57

As a newcomer to living in Jamestown, I thought I would take the opportunity to highlight a place that may be of interest to new residents or visitors.  Or maybe even spark the interest of longtime residents who may have seen signs for this spot, but never stopped by to explore.  The place I’m talking about is Watson Farm on North Main Road.  This past weekend, on May 6, the farm held its annual Sheep Shearing Day.  And what a fantastic activity for the family!  It was wonderful to have such an experience right here, minutes from home.  We didn’t have to venture over either one of the bridges for a day of learning and hands on experience  (Do I sound like a true Rhode Islander yet?)


Founded in 1796, Watson Farm is a 265-acre property and is a working family farm.  The original farmhouse is still standing and is used by the Minto family as their home.  The animals on the farm are grass fed during the year and a rotational grazing method is employed.  Raising the animals on grass, as opposed to grain, reduces labor and costs.


The Sheep Shearing Day is an opportunity for visitors to see the animals up close and personal.  And when I say up close, I mean my 3-year old daughter was able to hold baby chicks and ducks in her hands and pet newborn lambs.  She was able to see the sheep losing their ‘coats’ and understood that no, it did not hurt them.  Then she made her very own small sheep out of a pipe cleaner and pink wool, spun from a previous harvest. We saw a Red Devon cow, lots of cats, a rooster and the border collies that are used to herd the sheep.  We hiked up the hill to see bright green fields and a herd of sprightly sheep bounding up and over one another.  She got to see that in fact, there are black sheep, like in the song she’s been singing over and over. The expansive views of Narragansett Bay are like a painting.
 

And to top it all off, there was the best tree swing ever!  This was quite possibly the favorite activity for many of the kids.  The swing was made of a big piece of wood and tied to a huge tree by good, strong rope.  So simple, yet so entertaining.  We watched the ‘big’ kids go swooping up high, where you know they could feel that little twinge in their bellies.  My daughter mustered up her courage and didn’t try to stop me as I loaded her up a little more, a little more….Then I let go and swooooooshhhhhh!  I could hear her giggling and the people standing in line saying, ‘Look at that face!’  She was loving it!

Sometimes we get so caught up in the hustle and bustle of life.  Or we busy ourselves with activities that cost a lot of money, or make you interact with machines, or keep you cooped up indoors.  Don’t get me wrong, sometimes these are great, and necessary.  But I have to say, this was such a nice escape.  Things my daughter has read about or discussed in school became a reality.  And I felt like this activity really gave us the chance to connect on a more personal level.

All that from a little farm on Jamestown.   

For more information, go here.

 

-Elaine Infantolino

401.423.2200
islandrealtyri.com

Spotlight on Jamestown's Fort Getty

by Company 27. April 2011 06:06

Fort Getty is a town park located west of Mackerel Cove Beach.  The southern part of Narragansett Bay is split in half by 8 mile long Conanicut Island (aka Jamestown), forming East and West Passages.  Fort Getty overlooks West Passage and offers campsites for both tent and RV campers.  The park also offers a boat ramp, fishing area, camper services and showers.

Historically, Fort Getty was used as a U.S. Military Fort.  In 1775, during the Revolutionary War, the British Navy arrived in Newport and shortly after invaded Jamestown. They attacked Fort Getty and Fort Wetherill.  During World Wars I and II, it was used for observation and protection of the entrance to Narragansett Bay.  For more information, call (401) 423-7264.


A Personal Perspective – from owner Ginny Prichett


Last week, I saw Jeff McDonough's photo in the Jamestown Press of the cement blocks being laid for the new boat ramp at Ft. Getty.  It brought back memories for me of our 22' catamaran that we used to launch at Ft. Getty every year. So I took my camera and went for a ride on a lovely Monday to see what action I could see on the construction of the new ramp. A couple of photos are attached to this blog, but that's not why I'm writing.  I'm writing because Ft. Getty is one of Jamestown's gems. This gorgeous peninsula juts into Narragansett Bay with a 360 degree view from RI Sound, to the Dutch Island lighthouse, to West Ferry. Protected from northeastern breezes, with easy access to the West Passage of Narragansett Bay, this area is just gorgeous. The only other people out there when I visited on April 25 were the 2 men working on the new boat ramp, and I believe it was about quitting time. So the next time you are looking to take a walk in a very special place, this is my recommendation.






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